Effects of Hold Time, Angular Velocity, Pitch, and Luminance on Simulated Aircraft Identification Range

Charles J. Lloyd, DeForest Joralmon, Ryan Amann,
Chi-Feng Tai, William Morgan, and George Geri
L-3 Communications, Link Simulation & Training

Logan Williams, and Byron Pierce
711 HPW/RHA, Air Force Research Laboratory

Effects of Hold Time, Angular Velocity, Pitch, and Luminance on Simulated Aircraft Identification Range Effects of Hold Time, Angular Velocity, Pitch, and Luminance on Simulated Aircraft Identification Range

Abstract

This paper summarizes the findings from the first of two human factors evaluations conducted as part of the Immersive Display Evaluation and Assessment Study (IDEAS) program. In this evaluation experienced USAF F-16 pilots discriminated and positively identified distant fighter-sized aircraft. On each trial the ownship rapidly approached a pair of aircraft, one “friend” and one “foe,” and the observers designated the foe as quickly and accurately as they could.

This evaluation focused on the effects of three variables expected to be primary determinants of motion-induced blurring; hold time, angular velocity of the image, and pixel pitch. An external motion blur reduction shutter was used to systematically manipulate the hold time variable, thus, the luminance of the display system co-varied with hold time. Thus, a fourth independent variable, luminance, was included in the evaluation so that it’s effect could be separated from the hold time variable.

Prior to conducting the evaluation a computational model was prepared and used to make quantitative predictions of the effects of these design variables. The correlation between the model predictions and the results of the first evaluation was high (e.g., R2 > 0.75, p < 0.001, 109 df). After tuning three parameters in the model to the data the correlation increased significantly (R2 = 0.973, p < 0.001, 106 df).
A significant benefit provided by the model is the quantification of the interactions among the design variables. Thus, the model is useful for examining the impact of design trades among the variables that affect task performance.

A summary of this evaluation was published at the IMAGE 2011 conference. This report contains more of the details of the evaluation, the instructions to the observers, and a table of the mean data collected for the 220 experimental conditions.